INTERMEDIATE LANGUAGE PRACTICE MICHAEL VINCE MACMILLAN HEINEMANN 2006 PDF

We need another book because questions about creative language teaching are re-ignited by every teacher in every classroom in every country. Each time a language teacher enters a class, a silent experiment in hope and creativity is taking place: hope that the lesson will make a difference to at least one of its learners in some way; creativity in that teachers strive to give the lesson something of their own that goes beyond imitation or compliance. Instead they describe a sense of doing something of worth, and making a difference to their learners Bell, ; Johnstone, ; Tsui, This is why we will never run out of the need for teachers to tell us their stories about what they did, why, and how they know it worked.

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We need another book because questions about creative language teaching are re-ignited by every teacher in every classroom in every country. Each time a language teacher enters a class, a silent experiment in hope and creativity is taking place: hope that the lesson will make a difference to at least one of its learners in some way; creativity in that teachers strive to give the lesson something of their own that goes beyond imitation or compliance.

Instead they describe a sense of doing something of worth, and making a difference to their learners Bell, ; Johnstone, ; Tsui, This is why we will never run out of the need for teachers to tell us their stories about what they did, why, and how they know it worked.

The more specific and concrete we are with our stories of classrooms, the more it seems to tap into common and universal professional questions. This is one of the interesting mysteries of sharing professional stories. From it, multiple generative principles can be gleaned: meeting learners halfway, working with their interests and going beyond them, taking the creative and giving it structure, turning teaching disaster into gold.

In contrast, imperatives, and lists of principles, however worthy, simply cannot give us this richness; and they are to be read and taken on trust that somewhere, for some teacher, they worked.

This is why we need teachers to tell us their stories, and in discovering what is different about each of them, discover what is the same. It matters now more than ever that these stories from creative teachers are shared. Teacher narratives such as Appel in Germany, Aoki, Sunami, Li and Kinoshita in Japan, Doecke, Homer and Nixon in Australia, show teachers generating their own theories of good practice, often in contradiction to those externally imposed.

The more that external agencies are annointed to audit, measure, and quality assure, the less are we trusted to self-regulate, reflect and develop for ourselves: and it is this internal development that gives us a lifetime of growth as educators. This book offers resistance to mediocrity and compliance. What is special about this book is its eclectic mix of voices: both esteemed elders and welcome newcomers, teachers engaging with the creative arts, poetry, music, and visual arts; researchers creating connections between real world language and the language we teach.

There is the chance to track what a creative approach means to them and to tease out its multiple meanings as interpreted by them. All have their legitimate place, showing that it is possible to mark change in multiple different ways.

This book offers examples from advertising, Business English, visual arts, music, and literature. It is a testimony to our profession that it brings together teachers from such an eclectic mix of starting and arrival points. We can, and do, look at our teaching through the lens of psychology, business and management, game theory, language acquisition, sociology, literature, information technology and much more see my account of this in Spiro, As this book richly illustrates, we can each find our own particular way to make a difference.

What should we do as readers of this eclectic and heartfelt mix of accounts from the lives of language teachers? We can take these papers as examples of professional kinship and diversity; we can relate these papers to our own practice, or identify new questions to be asked of our own classrooms.

It is clear that narratives of professional practice do gather an accumulative weight in relation to one another. Importantly, it is the combining of stories that offer a powerful collective voice in response to trends within the profession. By stripping away the specificity of time or place, we can see beyond surface differences and relate to the common values and concerns that drive teachers and make their profession worthwhile.

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After struggling with him, Susan pulled the bag from his hands. I owned a horse once. Vince Michael. All rights reserved; no part langkage this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, transmitted in any form, or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise, without the prior written permission of the publishers.

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