ASCOCHYTA PISI PDF

Three species of the Ascochyta fungus can cause this disease: Ascochyta pisi Ascochyta pinodella, also known as Mycosphaerella pinodella Ascochyta pinodes, also known as Mycosphaerella pinodes According to seed testing procedures approved by Canadian Food Inspection Agency, no distinction needs be made between A. Why Does it Matter? Mycosphaerella blight, which is one of the ascochyta diseases, is found in all pea growing regions. Ascochyta pinodes can attack field beans and faba beans, as well as peas. Yield loss.

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Ascochyta pisi also infects 20 genera of plants and more than 50 plant species including soybean, sweet pea, lentil, alfalfa, common bean, clover, black-eyed-pea, and broad bean. Ascochyta blight of peas is one of the most important diseases of pea in terms of acreage affected.

More than one fungal species can cause this disease. This stage results in the production of wind-blown ascospores. Ascospore release begins in the spring and can continue into the summer if there is enough moisture.

Infected crop residue is the primary source of infection in the main pea producing areas. These fungal spores then penetrate the leaf. The conidia are spread short distances by wind and rain. Other Ascochyta blight pathogens have thick walled chlamydospores, which can survive for up to a few years in the soil. This can be important in helping to speed up crop residue decomposition. Agronomic practices promoting varieties and conditions that limit lodging and avoiding fields with excess nitrogen can reduce the spread and intensity of disease.

It is recommended to begin scouting during the vegetative stage and to continue scouting into the early flowering stage. The reason for this is to observe whether disease symptoms are moving upwards and are present on tendrils and flowers. A few other reasons to use fungicides are if the weather has been humid, if there is a forecast for rain, and if a high yield of peas would justify the cost of spraying fungicides.

Early flowering is the ideal time to apply these fungicides. They work by protecting the healthy green plant material, but will not repair plants affected by foot rot. High water volumes are necessary for full coverage of leaves and penetration of the plant canopy. Disease can be managed in multiple ways during and after planting. One method to manage disease is to follow the recommended seeding dates and rates to avoid fostering an ideal environment for the pathogen.

If the seed density is too high and planted too early, there is increased exposure to the plant pathogen. This seeding practice also creates an ideal environment for the pathogen because the plants often produce larger canopies and experience more lodging, which creates a close, high-humidity environment ideal for the pathogen.

Chemical control with fungicidal seed dressings is another effective method of control. An increase in severity of infection is often noted when the crop canopy closes due to the dense growth that prevents dry air from penetrating the canopy.

This creates a cool, humid, moist environment under the canopy, and as a result, the disease symptoms are most prevalent at the base of the canopy and spread up the plant. The optimal temperature for disease establishment and development is around 20oC. Spore dispersal and the development of the disease are slowed in the absence of high levels of moisture.

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Ascochyta pisi explained

Ascochyta pisi also infects 20 genera of plants and more than 50 plant species including soybean, sweet pea, lentil, alfalfa, common bean, clover, black-eyed-pea, and broad bean. Ascochyta blight of peas is one of the most important diseases of pea in terms of acreage affected. More than one fungal species can cause this disease. This stage results in the production of wind-blown ascospores. Ascospore release begins in the spring and can continue into the summer if there is enough moisture. Infected crop residue is the primary source of infection in the main pea producing areas. These fungal spores then penetrate the leaf.

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Ascochyta pisi f. pisi Lib., 1830

Infection can lead to reduction in field pea grade, productivity and even seed yield, if severe widespread infection occurs early in the growing season. Of the pea fields surveyed in Manitoba for root and foliar diseases in , mycosphaerella blight was present in all of them. It is the most common field pea disease in western Canada. Air-borne spores are released and spread by rain splash to plants nearby, or by wind to plants up to several kilometres away. This creates a disease risk even in fields where no field peas have been grown previously. Plant shoots can also be directly infected through exposure to resting spores in soil or from fungus on seeds that infects emerging seedlings.

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Canadian Journal of Botany

Donald Brewer and , Blair H. Subsequent colonization is at first subcuticular, then intercellular, resulting in the collapse and death of the host cells. No haustoria are formed. Resistance may be due in part to the cuticular barrier as well as to a physiologic factor which limits the colonization of the host once penetration has been effected. Pycnidial formation is symphogenous.

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What Causes Ascochyta Blight in Peas?

Ascochyta pisi explained Ascochyta pisi is a fungal plant pathogen that causes ascochyta blight on pea , causing lesions of stems, leaves, and pods. These same symptoms can also be caused by Ascochyta pinodes , and the two fungi are not easily distinguishable. Ascochyta pisi also infects 20 genera of plants and more than 50 plant species including soybean, sweet pea, lentil, alfalfa, common bean, clover, black-eyed-pea, and broad bean. Field pea is an annual, cool season legume that is native to northwest and southwest Asia. Ascochyta blight of peas is one of the most important diseases of pea in terms of acreage affected. More than one fungal species can cause this disease. Other pathogens that cause Ascochyta blight, besides Ascochyta pisi, include: Mycosphaerella pinodes , Phoma medicaginis var.

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