ALGERINE CAPTIVE PDF

Apr 02, Alexandria rated it liked it This is a really great read if you can pick up on all the irony and satire - otherwise, it would probably be pretty hard to get through. However, with the necessary consideration and a little guidance , this is a fascinating read. Would I bring The Algerine Captive into a classroom? I think that this would really depend on the students. They would have to not only understand the concepts of irony and satire, but be very adept at recognizing them in texts.

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Apr 02, Alexandria rated it liked it This is a really great read if you can pick up on all the irony and satire - otherwise, it would probably be pretty hard to get through. However, with the necessary consideration and a little guidance , this is a fascinating read. Would I bring The Algerine Captive into a classroom? I think that this would really depend on the students. They would have to not only understand the concepts of irony and satire, but be very adept at recognizing them in texts.

After all, while the content is good, it is a little hard to get through. The engagement factor is probably pretty low for the majority of the text though there are certainly spikes of very interesting points in the narrative and I think that there might be more relatable texts that teach the same things. Usually, when I read a book, I can immediately identify it as a text I would or would not bring into my classroom, but this is one of the few that I hesitate to say either way.

I do really like it, and taught well I think that students could gain a lot from it it would work amazingly well with multiple literary theories. Ooh, yeah! This would not be a text for every group of students that came through the door. Underhill is not a dynamic character. He should have been changed by his experience, but he comes home just as impotent, misogynistic, and ridiculous It was okay. He should have been changed by his experience, but he comes home just as impotent, misogynistic, and ridiculous as he began.

Volume I is more credible and powerful. The captivity part, in my opinion, was a failure. Instead telling readers how he suffered as a captive, Updike gives readers a history, geography, politics, and religion lesson that is incomplete, fragmented, half cooked, and just scattered over few pages. Aug 30, Scott Smith rated it liked it This book interesting as a very early American look at the world. The first half is a fun little romp through American society with a clueless Ichabod Crane character in a way Twain would later copy.

The second half is a much more somber account of his slavery in Algiers, that tries to make some sort of grand statement but largely falls flat I think. No life changer but an interesting little thing. I now feel that my eleventh-grade English class was deficient.

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The Blind Man of the Novel

Hailed as the emergence of a "tough-minded realism" in the American imaginary and as proof the national character developed from sensibility, the novel has been criticized for its irreligion and its piety, for its didacticism as well as for its failure to sustain a "moral imperative. The Algerine Captive appeared, after all, at a desperate time in American history. In the years leading up to and following the oppressive Alien and Sedition Acts of , the American experiment seemed at any moment to come undone, especially along the growing fault-line of slavery. Likewise, Mary Poovey has traced the way in which the "surveillance system" of double-entry bookkeeping contributed to a British political economy in which an ethical or theological conception of truth and value slowly gave way to an episto-factual one, which subsequent histories have identified as inherently expansionist. According to such a formulation, repeated investment in images of suffering others in sentimental literature as well as visual and dramatic arts enabled [End Page 2] their audiences to adapt to the similarly imaginary exchanges of finance capital and to navigate the distressing spectacle of slavery on which the new economy was built. In his investigation of this thinking, Tyler most directly engages with John Locke, who famously equates the understanding with seeing in his Essay Concerning Human Understanding

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The Algerine Captive, or The Life and Adventures of Doctor Updike Underhill

Plot summary[ edit ] The Algerine Captive tells the story of the upbringing, early career, and later enslavement of fictional Boston native, narrator Updike Underhill. Luckily for Underhill, the duel is discovered and preempted by the local sheriffs and constables before it can take place. In the final chapter of this volume, while Updike is on the African coast nursing five sick slaves back to health, he is captured and taken as a slave to Algiers. In the second volume, Updike describes his enslavement and gives an account of the country and people among which he is confined.

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